Economics

Image description: A snail walking along a mossy tree branch to symbolise a snail, symbol of degrowth.
Democracy, Economics, Featured, Green Agenda Journal 2022: Volume Two

Work for degrowth

With the ‘Greenslide’ and a substantial gain in seats towards holding the balance of power in the Senate, Australian Greens come out of the 2022 federal election stronger and more influential than ever. Similarly, the German Greens gained almost 15 percent of the votes in the September 2021 national elections. They doubled their 2017 election result, even if disappointing those... Read More

and , 6 days ago


Democracy, Economics, Environment, Featured, Green Agenda Journal 2022: Volume Two

Taking power back: Cooperative futures and Earthworker’s ‘Green New Deal from Below’

Earthworker is working towards a cooperative-centred Green New Deal in Australia, socialising energy production and ensuring workers in the industry are empowered and reap the benefits of the energy transition. Though not a top-down Green New Deal, but a ‘Green New Deal from Below’. Australia’s federal election results could finally be the catalyst for a nation-wide consensus to rapidly transition... Read More

by , 6 days ago

Earthworker Cooperative March

Degrowth economy: The pathway to human survival - Image Description - Jenga game about to collapse
Democracy, Economics, Featured, Green Agenda Journal 2022: Volume One

Degrowth economy: The pathway to human survival

Why do we need to transform government? We need to transform government because neither the needs of people, nor the needs of the planet are being met under this current government. The ‘people crisis’ can be summed up by the following statistics: 13.6% of Australians (including 17.7% of children) live in poverty. Wages have been stagnant for 20 years. Welfare... Read More

, 3 months ago


Economics, Environment, Featured, Green Agenda Quarterly Journal Winter 2021

Dissent within the contested transitions of the ecological endgame

Our collective progressive dissent over the deepening ecological crisis is at a political crossroads. The recent IPCC report confirms that the pace and form of global responses to the emergency are manifestly inadequate. This is highlighted by a multitude of alarming accelerated feedback loops, like the Amazon having transitioned into becoming a net emitter of carbon. Certainly we can point... Read More

by , 10 months ago

Dissent within the contested transitions of the ecological endgame

Without the right to stop work, all our rights are at risk - Iceland women's strike 1975
Democracy, Economics, Featured, Green Agenda Quarterly Journal Winter 2021

Without the right to stop work, all our rights are at risk

Why do most Australian workers have a standard of living with a minimum wage that keeps fully employed people out of poverty? It can be answered most simply by the long history of our forebears joining unions and going on strike. We have always needed to strike Have you ever stopped work to show your dissent in an organised way... Read More

, 10 months ago


Culture, Economics, Featured, Green Agenda Quarterly Journal Autumn 2021, Peace, Social Justice

Green Agenda Autumn 2021: On (in)security

“What’s the most dangerous place you’ve ever been?” People often ask me this question, curious because of my work. I’m a researcher and a practitioner in the protection of civilians from violence, and I have spent time in war zones and refugee camps and neighbourhoods with high rates of gun violence. At the moment, I live and work in South... Read More

by , 1 year ago

Insecurity Security In Politics And Policy - Green Agenda - Image of Gunshots and a target on a rusty wall

Security for the Big Polluters: Plantation forestry for carbon offset delays action on climate
Economics, Environment, Featured, Green Agenda Quarterly Journal Autumn 2021

Security for the Big Polluters: Plantation forestry for carbon offset delays action on climate

There is now growing acceptance – even amongst some of the most ardent of once anti-environmentalists – on the need for urgent action to curb global greenhouse gas emissions, stabilise the earth’s atmosphere, and limit the worst effects of global climate chaos. At the United Nations climate negotiations, a disparate group of nation states, First Nations, civil society, and along... Read More

, 1 year ago


Economics, Featured, Green Agenda Quarterly Journal Autumn 2021, Social Justice

Housing security – do we really understand the challenge?

In the six years I was in the flat, my rent had risen from $300 to $415 a week. Some of this reflected the market, but increasingly the condition of the flat did not reflect the rent… After three months of soggy and ruined food, I finally asked for a rent reduction. No response. So, I asked for compensation. No... Read More

by , 1 year ago

Housing security - do we really understand the challenge? Green Agenda

The trash economy: employment in the post-Covid era
Economics, Featured, Green Agenda Quarterly Journal Spring 2020, Social Justice

The trash economy: employment in the post-Covid era

On a landfill site outside the village of Kafr Lusin in northwest Syria, teenagers sort through the mountain of toxic household waste, looking for reusable plastic that can be traded for a few coins. At the Ars Electronica Centre in Linz, school children visiting the Machine Learning Studio work with tech trainers to learn how robots are programmed. These might... Read More

, 2 years ago


Economics, Featured, Green Agenda Quarterly Journal Spring 2020, Social Justice

A casual reflection on academia: before and after the pandemic

COVID-19 has thrown Australia’s university sector into crisis. For the past two decades, the tertiary education industry has expanded on the back of rising international student enrolments. However, the coronavirus pandemic, and the resultant border closures, have disconnected universities from these enrolments, one of their most significant revenue streams. Universities have been hard hit: Job losses have already commenced as... Read More

by , 2 years ago

A casual reflection on academia: before and after the pandemic